Self-efficacy and Clinical Performance of Nurses Initiated and Management of Antiretroviral Therapy: Narrative Review



Nozuko Glenrose Mangi1, *, Daniel Ter Goon1, Elizabeth Matsidiso Yako2
1 Faculty of Health Science, University of Fort Hare, No 5 Oxford Street, East London, South Africa
2 College of Nursing-Al Ahsa King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Al Ahsa, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Introduction:

Self-efficacy plays a major role in the behaviour of a human being by how he/she approaches a goal, task or a challenge so that a desired level of performance is produced. The objective of this paper is to review and analyse literature on self-efficacy and clinical performance among professional nurses regarding quality of care in implementation of NIMART programme.

Methodology:

A literature review was conducted using online resources. Search engines included EBSCO, Google Scholar, Medline, PubMed, Psych info and BIOMED Central articles and journals published between 2007 and 2017. Relevant papers on self-efficacy and clinical performance regarding the implementation of NIMART programme in South Africa were analysed.

Results:

278 papers were identified and 22 eligible papers were selected for analysis. Reviewed literature exhibited that self-efficacy is very crucial in the clinical performance of nurses in the implementation of NIMART. Self-efficacy helps to predict motivation and performance of individuals. Lack of mentoring, support and exposure to clinical practice had negative effect on nurse’s self-efficacy.

Conclusion:

Given the paucity of information on self-efficacy and clinical performance of NIMART in the South African context, future studies are warranted to gain more understanding of self-efficacy in the clinical performance of professional nurses.

Keywords: Antiretroviral therapy, Clinical performance, HIV/AIDS, Literature review, Quality of care, Narrative review, Self-efficacy.


Abstract Information


Identifiers and Pagination:

Year: 2019
Volume: 12
Publisher Item Identifier: EA-TOPHJ-2018-77

Article History:

Received Date: 10/10/2018
Revision Received Date: 30/01/2019
Acceptance Date: 07/02/2019
Electronic publication date: 20/02/2019
Collection year: 2019

© 2019 Mangi et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode). This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Correspondence: Address correspondence to this author at the Faculty of Health Science, University of Fort Hare, No 5 Oxford Street, East London, South Africa; E-mail: nozukomangi@gmail.com