RESEARCH ARTICLE


Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Urban Harare, Zimbabwe



Godwell Nhidza1, Kudzaishe Mutsaka2, Garikai Malunga3, Danai Tavonga Zhou1, 3, *
1 Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences, P.O. Box AV 178, Avondale, Harare, Zimbabwe
2 Department of Chemical Pathology, University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences, P.O. Box AV 178, Avondale, Harare, Zimbabwe
3 Department of Health (Medical Laboratory Sciences), Africa University, College of Health, Agriculture and Natural Sciences, P.O. Box 1320, Mutare, Zimbabwe


Article Metrics

CrossRef Citations:
0
Total Statistics:

Full-Text HTML Views: 2057
Abstract HTML Views: 2162
PDF Downloads: 1120
ePub Downloads: 967
Total Views/Downloads: 6306
Unique Statistics:

Full-Text HTML Views: 1058
Abstract HTML Views: 830
PDF Downloads: 448
ePub Downloads: 319
Total Views/Downloads: 2655



© 2018 Nhidza et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences, P.O. Box AV 178, Avondale, Harare; Department of Health (Medical Laboratory Sciences), Africa University, College of Health, Agriculture and Natural Sciences, P.O. Box 1320, Mutare, Zimbabwe; Tel: +263772566214; E-mails: danaizh@yahoo.co.uk, d.t.zhou@medisin.uino


Abstract

Introduction:

According to the WHO, Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) means glucose intolerance with onset during pregnancy. Unfortunately, women affected by GDM could suffer from Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) later while babies born to mothers with GDM are at increased risk of being too large for gestational age. This cross-sectional study screened GDM in women attending Parirenyatwa Antenatal Clinic in urban Harare, Zimbabwe using 2006 WHO diagnostic criteria.

Methodology:

Urine samples were collected from all consenting pregnant women. If urinalysis indicated glycosuria and if a woman reported clinical symptoms of GDM, random blood sugar analysis was subsequently carried out. Those suspected of having GDM due to elevated glucose (n=17) were screened with glucose load challenge the following day, after collecting the sample for fasting blood sugar. Family history of diabetes was self-reported.

Results:

Women (N=150), between 24 – 28 weeks of gestation who consented were recruited. Participants had mean age 27.2(3.5) years and about half were gradiva 1. All participants reported no maternal history of T2DM, but reported other family history of T2DM. Out of the 150 recruited and 17 tested by OGTT, 10 (6.7%) tested positive for GDM.

Conclusion:

Prevalence of GDM is lower than two similar African studies but similar to one Indian study. Of note is the fact that variations in reported prevalence, in populations from different studies could be due to different diagnostic criteria used. Results need further enquiry on larger group of pregnant women using latest 2013 WHO criteria.

Keywords: ANC, GDM, OGTT, Prevalence, Screening, Parirenyatwa, Zimbabwe.