RESEARCH ARTICLE


Association between Selected Food Purchase Practices, Physical Activity and Sociodemographic Factors among People Living in a Low Socioeconomic Peri-Urban and Rural Area of South Africa



Sunday O. Onagbiye1, 2, *, Tsolekile Lungiswa1, Puoane Thandi1
1 School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa
2 Department of Sport, Recreation and Exercise Science, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa


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Creative Commons License
© 2020 Onagbiye and Lungiswaet al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa; Tel: +905488652606; E-mail:sonagbiye@uwc.ac.za


Abstract

Introduction:

This study examined the association between sociodemographic factors, Physical Activity (PA) engagement, and the selected Food Purchasing Practices (FPP) among people living in a low socioeconomic peri-urban and rural area of two provinces of South Africa.

Methodology:

Four hundred participants were randomly selected from two communities, a township in Cape Town and a rural community in the Eastern Cape where the Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study was implemented. Data collected included socio-demographic characteristics, FPP and PA. Logistic regressions were performed to identify the associations between sociodemographic factors, PA involvement and selected FPP, and Odds Ratios (OR) were calculated with 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs). All statistical tests were two-tailed at p<0.05.

Results:

A large percent, 76.3% were females and 23.8% were males. Compared to participants aged ≥55 years, those within the age range of 25-54 years were more likely to travel with motorised transport (OR= 4.7; 95% CI=2.6, 8.3; p < 0.001) compared to walking to grocery shop. None-to-low education and with monthly income of <R2000 were more likely to purchase groceries at the supermarkets (OR= 2.7; 95% CI=1.4, 5.0; p < 0.05) and (OR= 2.4; 95% CI=1.1, 5.1; p < 0.05) compared to spaza or small informal food shop, respectively, while those who engage in PA were less likely to purchase groceries at the supermarkets (OR= 0.36; 95% CI=0.2, 0.8; p < 0.05).

Conclusion:

Some demographic factors and PA have an influence on FPP among people living in a low socioeconomic peri-urban and rural area of two provinces of South Africa. This might be an area to be focused on for public health interventions which could be directed at supporting adequate FPP among people, especially in low socio-economic areas.

Keywords: Adults, Food practices, Groceries, Low socio-economic, NCDs, South Africa.