RESEARCH ARTICLE


Personal and Environmental Risk Factors of Work-Related Stress: A Cross-Sectional Study among Female Workers of a Textile Industry in Indonesia



Haris Setyawan1, Hanifa M. Denny2, *, Nurjazuli Nurjazuli3, Endah Kumala Dewi4
1 Doctoral Student in Public Health, Faculty of Public Health, Diponegoro University, Semarang, Indonesia
2 Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Faculty of Public Health, Diponegoro University, Semarang, Indonesia
3 Department of Environmental Health, Faculty of Public Health, Diponegoro University, Semarang, Indonesia
4 Faculty of Psychology, Diponegoro University, Semarang, Indonesia


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Creative Commons License
© 2022 Setyawan et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Faculty of Public Health, Diponegoro University, SemarangIndonesia; Tel: +62811296228; E-mail: hanifadenny@live.undip.ac.id


Abstract

Background:

In 2017, the prevalence of work-related stress reached 10.7% of the 792 million population. This work-related stress is common in the textile industry, characterized by many environmental risk factors coming from the weaving processes. The stress problem is discussed in various countries worldwide.

Objective:

The study aimed to investigate the personal and environmental risk factors for work-related stress in textile industry workers.

Methods:

This cross-sectional study was conducted in a textile factory weaving section in Solo, Indonesia. The subjects of this study were 188 female weaving operators that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The sound level meter was operated to measure the environmental noise, while environmental working conditions, work experience, social support, and work-related stress were measured using questionnaires. Furthermore, the Somers' Delta correlation was used to analyze the relationship between personal and environmental risk factors for work-related stress.

Results:

Surprisingly, this study found no significant correlation between personal and environmental risk factors (independent variables) with work-related stress (dependent variables). In personal factors, most of the workers are late adulthood (36-45 years old), the length of working dominated more than ten years (90.42%), with most of them having senior high school education (58.51%). In terms of environmental risk factors, most of the workers have good working environment conditions (51.6%); are well experienced in weaving tasks (54.3%), with a high social support category (58%).

Conclusion:

Although some previous studies indicated that personal factors, working conditions, and social support could trigger stress among workers, this study found no correlation between the independent and the dependent variables.

Keywords: Noise, Social support, Work experience, Work-related stress, Weaving processes, Female workers.