RESEARCH ARTICLE


The Interpretation of Prescribed Medication Instructions by Diabetes Mellitus Patients at a Selected Clinic in the Capricorn District of Limpopo Province, South Africa: A Pilot Study



C. Ngoatle1, *, T.M. Mothiba2, M.J. Themane3
1 Department of Nursing Sciences, University of Limpopo, Polokwane, South Africa
2 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Limpopo, Polokwane, South Africa
3 Department of Educational Studies, University of Limpopo, Polokwane, South Africa


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Creative Commons License
© 2019 Ngoatle et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at Department of Nursing Sciences, University of Limpopo, Polokwane, South Africa; Tel: 083 878 0152;
Fax: 015 268 3080; E-mail: charityngoatle@gmail.com


Abstract

Background:

Misinterpretation of medications instructions due to poor health literacy is common in diabetic patients, leading to suboptimal medication therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate patients’ interpretation of prescribed medication instructions at a selected Clinic in the Capricorn District of Limpopo Province, South Africa.

Methods:

The study used a qualitative research approach. Non-Probability purposive sampling was used to select five participants for the study. Semi-structured interviews with a guide were used to collect data. Tesch’s steps for qualitative data analysis were adopted.

Results:

The study findings revealed inadequate explanation of instructions, poor health outcomes, lack of information related to poor health outcomes, lack of knowledge on using the medication correctly, and medication noncompliance. The findings imply that there is poor education regarding medication use by diabetic patients.

Conclusion:

The study indicated that diabetic patients have poor medication instructions comprehension such as an inadequate explanation of the medication instructions. Therefore, healthcare professionals must provide in-depth explanation of medication instructions to enhance comprehension.

Keywords: Instructions, Diabetes mellitus, Misinterpretation, Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs), Prescribed medication, Lack of medication knowledge.